Analyzing and Conceptualizing the Theoretical Foundations of Nursing

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Analyzing and Conceptualizing the Theoretical Foundations of Nursing

SKU# 9780826161017

Author: Janice M. Morse PhD (Nurs), PhD (Anthro), FCAHS, FAAN

$125.00

Description 

Delivers all information required for the Theoretical Foundations of Nursing course

By embracing the major conceptual and theoretical contributions to nursing research that are outside of traditional nursing theory, this book serves as a vital resource for nurse researchers, and one that is indispensable for doctoral nursing students embarking on their dissertations. Containing the full complement of information required for the Theoretical Foundations of Nursing course for PhD programs, the text supports the foundational skills needed for excellence in research and scholarship. The book examines in depth the components of nursing theory and the types of theory used in nursing research and practice, and teaches students about the nature and use of concepts and the development of critical thinking skills that are essential for nursing research.

This text contains information for developing concepts and middle-range theory, using a variety of qualitative research methods, broadening theoretical scope by linking middle-range theories, and moving knowledge toward certainty by use of evidence. It also illustrates the construction of frameworks for quantitative inquiry, exploring theory in mixed-method design and how theory develops knowledge. Each method includes a description of the methodological approach and examples of subsequent concept or theory development. The text includes several methods for the development of concepts, micro- and mid-range theories using qualitative research, and a discussion of the new trend of moving these qualitative theories toward practice-based evidence. Each section of the book contains practical examples and supplementary activities that encourage inquiry. An instructor’s manual is included for adopters of the text.

Key Features:

  • Teaches the significance of and foundations of perspective, concepts, qualitatively derived theory, quantitative frameworks, quantitative theoretical development, knowledge development from research, application, and evidence
  • Focuses on current nursing research and how it is used in practice today
  • Demonstrates the significant relationship between theory, research, knowledge development, evidence, and practice
  • Promotes excellence in scholarship and research
  • Includes an extensive instructor’s manual

Product Details 

  • Publication Date August 31, 2016
  • Page Count 834
  • Product Form Hardback
  • ISBN 13 9780826161017

About The Author(s) 

Janice M. Morse, PhD (Nurs), PhD (Anthro), FCAHS, FAAN, is a professor and Barnes Presidential Chair, College of Nursing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and professor emeritus, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Her research contributions include the development of the Praxis Theory of Suffering and Comforting, the Morse Fall Scale (in use internationally), and the advancement of qualitative and mixed-method research. She has edited Qualitative Health Research (QHR) and Global Qualitative Nursing Research, and was founding editor of the International Journal of Qualitative Methods (IJQM). Her publications include Compassionate Nursing, Principles of Mixed-Method Designs, Preventing Patient Falls (Springer Publishing Company), and texts for several qualitative methods. In 1997, she founded the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM), directing a network of eight international hubs and 115 universities, supporting training for QHR and mentoring qualitative researchers globally. She was the recipient of the fifth Sigma Theta Tau Episteme Award, an inductee of the Sigma Theta Tau Hall of Fame, and has received honorary doctorates from institutions in Australia and Canada.

Table of Contents 

CONTENTS

Contributors

Preface

Acknowledgments

SECTION I: DESPERATELY SEEKING THEORY

1. The Fringes of Knowledge

Janice M. Morse

The Science of the Art

Exploring the Fringes: The Clinical Utility of Concept Inquiry

The Essentialness of Examining Our Practice

Why Do We Have to Know?

The Role of Values in Developing Knowledge

The Rise of Nursing Research and the Use of Frameworks and Models

2. Where We Came From

Janice M. Morse

Chasing Nursing Theory

The Need for Nursing Theory

The Need for Nurse Scientists

The Need for Nursing Concepts

Mid-Range and Situation-Specific Theories

The Need for Nurse Educators

The Performance and Products of Nurse Researchers

Nursing Theory for Directing Nursing Actions for Patient Care

The Gap Remains

Did We Forget?

Where Are We Now?

Where Are We Going?

3. Seeing What We Know: Knowing What We See

Laura Bohannan

Shakespeare in the Bush

4. Incorporating Theory Into Practice Research

Janice M. Morse

Scenario

Nursing Perspectives

Dialogue

Discussion

5. Orientation 101: Definitions and Other Essential Extraneous Notes

Janice M. Morse

Paradigm

6. The Battlefield of Knowledge: Different Purposes, Different Approaches

Janice M. Morse

Inductive Approaches to Concept Development

Deductive Approaches to Concept Development

Developing Quantitative Models and Theories

Abduction

The Complementary Relationship Between Qualitative and Quantitative Knowledge

Last Thoughts

SECTION II: ALL ABOUT CONCEPTS

The Conceptualization of Concepts

7. Concepts in Context

Janice M. Morse

What Is Context?

What Is a Concept?

Behavioral Concepts

The Structure of Concepts

The “Anatomy” of Concepts

Recontextualization

The “Physiology” of Concepts

Types of Concepts

Approaches to Understanding Concepts

The Contribution of Concepts

Frameworks and Models

Theory

Last Words

8. Summary of Major Methods for Exploring Concepts

Janice M. Morse

Philosophical Methods for Concept Analysis

Meta-Analytic Methods

Combined Methods: Methods Using the Literature and Qualitative Data

Methods Using Qualitative Inquiry

Summary

9. Inductive–Deductive Pitfalls in Concept Development

Janice M. Morse

The Myth of Induction

Exploring Qualitatively Derived Concepts: Inductive Techniques

Summary

10. The Pink Elephant Paradox (or, Avoiding the Misattribution of Data)

Judith A. Spiers

The Importance of Nurse–Patient Communication

The Concept of Vulnerability

Exploring Vulnerability in Home Care Nurse–Patient Interactions

Summary

11. Concept Evaluation: Determining Appropriate Strategies for Concept Development

Janice M. Morse

Determining Level of Maturity

The Process of Assessing Concepts

The Level of Maturity

SECTION III: EMERGING CONCEPTS

12. Qualitative Strategies for Concept Development

Janice M. Morse

Targeting Concepts Using Qualitative Inquiry

Building Lay Concepts Epistemologically

Qualitative Methods for Developing Concepts

A Mapping Method to Locate a Concept

Kristy K. Martyn

Qualitative Strategies for Identifying Concepts

Example of Interpretative Coding: Getting Behind the Data

Janice M. Morse, Kim Martz, and Terrie Vann-Ward

Analytic Strategies for Identifying Attributes

Qualitative Research Strategies for Expanding Concepts

Summary

13. Concept Identification Using Qualitative Inquiry

Janice M. Morse

Developing a Concept From Data: The Example of Compathy

Role of Compathy in Knowledge Development

14. Building Concepts

Janice M. Morse

Concept-Supporting Data

The Data–Concept Link

Developing Concepts to Using Studies to Support an Emerging Concept

Emerging Concepts

The Case of “Preserving Self”

Summary

15. Qualitative Structured Techniques

Janice M. Morse

Targeted Strategies for Concept and Attribute Development

Summary

16. The Prototypical Method

Janice M. Morse

The Prototypical Method

The Case of Hope

Summary

SECTION IV: PARTIALLY DEVELOPED CONCEPTS

17. Concept Clarification: The Use of Pragmatic Utility

Janice M. Morse

Procedures: Doing Pragmatic Utility

18. Research Using Pragmatic Utility

Janice M. Morse

Example I: Concept Clarification Inside a Concept: The Conceptualizations of Caring and Caring as a Concept

Comparing the Conceptualizations and Theories of Care

Discussion on Caring as a Concept

Example II: Concept Clarification: Accounting for Strategies of Empathetic Comforting

Summary: Back to Pragmatic Utility as a Method

19. Concept Comparison

Janice M. Morse

The Patterns and Uses of Concept Comparison

Allied Concepts

Concept Comparison as a Method

Patterns of Concept Comparison

The Example: The Conceptual Cohesion of Social Support

Judith E. Hupcey

Evaluating Concepts for Appropriate Application

The Example: Trust

Judith E. Hupcey

Recognizing When It Is Good: Criteria for Excellence in Concept Development

Hints for Getting It Right

“What About Reliability and Validity?”

Criterion for Adequacy

Summary

20. Self-Transcendence and Self-Reformulation: One Concept or Two?

Patricia L. Eldershaw and Janice M. Morse

Self-Transcendence

Self-Reformulation

Comparing the Concepts

Method

Results

Discussion

SECTION V: TOWARD MID-RANGE THEORY

21. From Concept Development to Qualitatively Derived Theory: Ethical Sensitivity in Professional Practice

Kathryn Weaver

Overview

Concept Analysis Using Pragmatic Utility

Explicating Concept Anatomy

Moving From Anatomy of the Concept to Its Physiology

Evaluating Concept Maturity

Advancing the Concept of Ethical Sensitivity Using Critical Appraisal

Toward Clearer Understanding of the Concept

Beyond Concept Analyses to Systematic Classification and Theory Construction

Summary

22. Linking and Ordering Concepts

Janice M. Morse

The Process of Qualitatively Developing Mid-Range Theories

Linking Concepts

Linking Concepts in the Process of Inquiry

Context Dependency and Linking Concepts

Determining Linkages Between Concepts

Ordering Concepts

Conceptual Development: The Maturity of the Theory

Other Techniques for Developing Concepts to Theory

Diagramming as a Tool

Qualitative Generalizability

The Last Thought

23. Making Useful Theory: Making Theory Useful

Janice M. Morse

Making Useful Theory

What Is Mid-Range Theory?

The Role of Theory

The Structure of Mid-Range Theories

Types of Qualitatively Derived Theory

The Process of Qualitatively Developing Mid-Range Theories

Processes of Theory Construction

The Structure of Mid-Range Theory

Setting Up Your Study to Develop Qualitatively Derived Theory

Developing Theory Using Conceptual Inquiry

Examples of Qualitatively Derived Mid-Range Theories

The Place of Concept Development: Understanding Its Contribution in Research Programs and Its Contribution to Knowledge and Praxis

Indices of Theoretical Adequacy

Toward Certainty

Rigor

The Place of Concept Development

Summary

24. Modes of Releasing in the Praxis Theory of Suffering: The Responses of Women to the Results of Breast Biopsy

Janice M. Morse and Charlotte Pooler

Literature

Methods

Results

Discussion

SECTION VI: MIXED- AND MULTIPLE-METHOD APPROACHES

25. Expanding Theory Using Mixed Methods

Janice M. Morse

Mixed-Method Approaches

Example of Qualitatively Driven Mixed-Method Design: Patterns of Attending

26. Developing Theory Using Mixed Methods: Patterns of Attending in Nursing

Joan L. Bottorff

The Study of Nurse–Patient Interactions

A Model of Nurse–Patient Interactions

Development of a Coding Scheme to Explore Patterns of NPI

Discussion

Summary

SECTION VII: THE QUANTITATIVE MINDFRAME

27. Developing Quantitative Theory

Janice M. Morse

The Role of Quantitative Theory

Creating Theoretical Frameworks

Evaluating the Literature

Identifying the Concepts

Operationalization

Planning Your Research Design

Building the Model

The Theoretical Framework

Examples of Models for Multivariate Research

Frameworks

Evaluating Quantitative Theory

Summary

28. The Social Determinants of Health: An Expanded Conceptual Framework for Nursing

Shirley M. Solberg

What Are the Social Determinants of Health?

Evolution of Social Determinants of Health

Beginning the Debate

The Social Determinants Identified

Models Used for Social Determinants of Health Framework

Assumptions and Principles of the Committee on the Social Determinants of Health Model

Evidence for Social Determinants of Health Framework

Research and the Social Determinants of Health

Strategies for Research and Policy Development on the SDH

Social Determinants of Health in Nursing: Possibilities

SECTION VIII: TOWARD CERTAINTY: BUILDING A MATURE THEORETICAL BASE

29. Toward Certainty: Qualitative Meta-Synthesis

Janice M. Morse

The Development of Meta-Synthesis

30. Meta-Synthesis of Nursing Presence

Deborah Finfgeld-Connett

Meta-Synthesis of Nursing Presence

Methodology

Findings

Discussion

Summary

31. Perceived Competency and Resolution of Homelessness Among Women With Substance Abuse Problems

Deborah Finfgeld-Connett, Tina L. Bloom, and E. Diane Johnson

Methodology

Findings

Provision of Services in the Context of Distorted Perceptions of Competency

Discussion

Summary

Funding

32. Developing Theory Using Meta-Analysis

Janice M. Morse

Meta-Analysis

Doing Meta-Analysis

Developing the Illness-Constellation Model

33. Toward a Theory of Illness: The Illness-Constellation Model

Janice M. Morse

Stage I: The Stage of Uncertainty

Stage II: Stage of Disruption

Stage III: Striving to Regain Self

Stage IV: Regaining Wellness

Discussion

Other Examples of Qualitative Meta-Analysis

SECTION IX: TOWARD THEORY-BASED INTERVENTIONS

34. Theoretical Coalescence

Janice M. Morse

The Limited Scope of Mid-Range Theory

35. The Evolution of Our Understanding of Suffering: The Praxis Theory of Suffering

Janice M. Morse

Background

The Physiology of the Model

36. Toward Understanding Comfort and Comforting

Janice M. Morse

Assumptions About Comfort and Comforting

Doing Theoretical Coalescence

Axioms

Summary

37. The Praxis Theory of Comfort and Comforting

Janice M. Morse

Contextual Factors Influencing Comfort and Comforting

The Praxis Theory of Comfort and Comforting

Nursing Approach

Attaining Comfort

The Comforting Interaction

The Interactive Components

The Complexity of Providing Comfort: The Comforting Relationship

Summary

38. The Theory of Becoming Resolute: Guiding Mental Health Practice With Survivors of Maltreatment

Joanne M. Hall

Marginalization as the Paradigm

Narrative and Theory

Research Underpinnings of the Theory of Becoming Resolute

Narrative Threads of Becoming Resolute

Supportive Threads

Central Dynamic Threads of Becoming Resolute

Clinically Relevant Findings

Discussion of the Study Findings

Narrative Threads and Conventional Concepts

Relationships Among Narrative Threads of Becoming Resolute

Becoming Resolute: From Theory to Practice

Clinical Principles Toward Becoming Resolute

The Story From Here

SECTION X: POSTFACE

39. The Myth of a Theory Base

Janice M. Morse

Dissemination or Dissipation?

The Problem of Dissemination

Summary

Postface: The (R)Evolution of Nursing

Index